FBI Probe Sheds Light on Big Problems in NCAA

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Courtesy: USA Today- For The Win

Many big programs in NCAA Basketball look like they’re in big trouble as Brian Bowen Sr. has shed light on even more schools than the ones originally mentioned in the FBI probe- Arizona, Louisville, NC State, and Miami (all Adidas-sponsored, who is at the heart this whole thing. Brian Bowen Sr. mentioned Arizona, Creighton, Oklahoma State, and Texas for offering him thousands and thousands of dollars in order for his son, Brian Bowen II, to play at their respective schools. Bowen is now playing professionally in Australia after the turmoil at Louisville that brought down Rick Pitino made him the face of the NCAA corruption investigation (Bowen Sr. was paid $100K by Louisville). You can read more, but it’s not just the schools that anyone has mentioned that could be in big trouble: recruiting, in general, has become about the money and no school is safe. ESPN has another good article here that details the schools, coaches, players, defendants, and witnesses involved in the trial.

NCAA Rule Changes Not Received Well

Despite the NCAA trying to at least make an appearance to put the students first, the reforms that the NCAA put in place yesterday were not well received by fans or organizations and participants who were reportedly blindsided by the changes. ESPN’s Adrian Wojnarowski wrote a report on NBA and USAB executives’ surprise at the changes, who did discuss the matter, but neither organization believed they had come to any consensus with the NCAA. USA Basketball intends to expand the sport of basketball, not confine it to “elite players” for the sake of determining who is allowed to have an agent. The organization would prefer that this job is left to the NBA instead.

Myron Metcalf spoke of his dismay on ESPN, in addition with SBNation’s Ricky O’Donnell and Duke Basketball Report’s JD King. The changes obviously attempt to address the issues that the FBI’s investigation surfaced, but do not address them. Really, all I can say is that at least they made an attempt. One major issue? Players who want to return to school must have attended the NBA Combine to be permitted to do so, which only includes a handful of players. If a player attended the NBA Combine, the player is likely to be drafted. Look at the list below:

So out of who knows how many undrafted student-athletes last year, only four would have the opportunity to return to school? Wow. What help.

There are a LOT of issues still to be solved. But at least they’re trying? Well, maybe what they’re “trying” to do is win back favor in the public’s eyes. Regardless, there is work to do. A lot of it.

Featured image on the homepage is courtesy of USA Today Sports.

Massive Changes In Store for College Basketball

After becoming immersed in FBI investigations last year for corruption involved with the sport, the NCAA has announced some majorly huge changes for college basketball. In summary, based on the NCAA’s report on the rule changes, here they are:

  • The number of visits has been increased.
  • With a pending decision from the NBA and NBPA, high school players can have an agent by July 1st before their senior year, provided they are identified as an elite senior prospect by USA Basketball.
    • This rule becomes effective if/when the NBA/NBPA reaches the decision to allow high school students in the NBA Draft
  • College basketball players can be represented by an agent if they ask for an assessment from the NBA Undergraduate Advisory Committee
    • Effective immediately.
    • Agents are permitted to pay for expenses, including meals and transportation for players and their families.
      • This rule is effective when any relevant state laws are changed, including the Uniform Athletes Agent Act, Revised Uniform Athletes Agent Act, and others.
    • Agreements between players and agents must be:
      • In writing.
      • Terminated when a player enrolls in or returns to college.
      • Disclosed to the NCAA (for players in high school) and the school (for players in college).
    • To work with a student-athlete, agents must be NCAA-certified.
  • Students who wish to enter the NBA Draft must seek an evaluation from the NBA Undergraduate Advisory Committee, providing information to advise the students in their decisions on whether to stay in school or enter the draft.
  • Student-athletes who are not drafted, attended an evaluation, and attended the Combine will be permitted to re-enroll in school provided that they alert their athletic director of their decision by 5pm the Monday following the draft.
    • Effective if/when the NBA makes an expected decision making undrafted athletes who return to college ineligible for the NBA draft until the completion of the next college basketball season.
  • Required funding and assistant from schools for players returning for degree completion.
    • Effective August 1, 2019.

These new changes will be groundbreaking for the NCAA and all of college basketball. Of course, many of these changes are pending a decision by the NBA and NBPA. It’ll take a while, but we may just be witnessing the end of the one-and-done era.

De’Aaron Fox had some choice words for the NCAA:

When it comes to the “elite” prospect rule, what about guys who aren’t USA Basketball eligible? International players, like R.J. Barrett, for one?

It’s a work in progress, mostly in the right direction.

The featured image on the homepage is courtesy of The Athletic.